The Ghoul (Special Edition) [Blu-ray] (2016)

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Item details

Condition
Used
Format
Blu-ray Disc
Region
Blu-ray: A (includes US, CA)
Genre
Horror
UPC
760137043782

More about this item

Digital copies and codes not included.
Video in good used condition, 100% guaranteed to play like new.

 

>From executive producer Ben Wheatley (Kill List, Free Fire) comes a mind-bending British psychological thriller to sit alongside such classics of the genre as Nicolas Roeg and Donald Cammell s Performance, David Lynch s Lost Highway and Christopher Nolan s Following.

Chris is a homicide detective called to London to investigate a strange double murder. Both victims appear to have continued moving towards their assailant despite multiple gunshots to the face and chest. On a hunch, and with the help of an old colleague and former girlfriend Chris decides to go undercover as a patient to investigate the suspect s psychotherapist, the mysterious Alexander Morland, who has a taste for the occult...

The debut feature of writer-director Gareth Tunley, starring Tom Meeten (Sightseers), Alice Lowe (Garth Marenghi s Darkplace) and Dan Renton Skinner (Notes on Blindness), The Ghoul is the latest standout addition to a thriving new wave of British cinema.

DIRECTOR-APPROVED SPECIAL EDITION CONTENTS

  • High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) presentation
  • Original uncompressed 5.1 audio
  • Optional English subtitles for the hard-of-hearing
  • Filmmakers commentary
  • Interviews with the cast and crew
  • The Baron, a 2013 short film by Gareth Tunley, starring Tom Meeten and Steve Oram (Aaaaaaaah!, Sightseers)
  • Trailer
  • FIRST PRESSING ONLY: Booklet featuring writing on the film by Adam Scovell, author of Folk Horror: Hours Dreadful and Things Strange